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ALWAYS interview like you WANT the job!

Updated: Sep 19, 2022

“There’s nothing more fun than interviewing for a job”, said no one ever. Most of us would prefer a hard pass, but the benefits far exceed a passive stance. Let's look at some considerations for accepting an interview.


Determine Objective Job Satisfaction in Real Time


Here’s a super quick exercise to help evaluate if you are currently on the right path for your career. Close your eyes and picture a realistic "perfect" (exclude being a rockstar for this example) job for yourself. Get your pen ready and write these down. What are the top five things that position would offer (think compensation, location, flexibility, seniority level, benefits, culture, title)? On the next line, write down three things that you know are a big stretch, but you would LOVE to have (think compensation again, benefits you’ve heard about but have never had access to - like a gym membership or paid maternity/paternity leave, seniority level and perks). Lastly, think of three things that would immediately be a turn-off if you discovered them while interviewing for your “perfect” job.


What you’ve just done is determine your 1) Must-haves 2) Would-like-to-haves and 3) Deal-breakers for where you want (or don’t want) to be in your career. If your “Must-haves” are not perfectly aligned with your current role, you should be open to accepting interviews. If you have little-to-no opportunity to obtain a “Would-like-to-have” in the next 2-4 years with your existing company, you should be open to interviewing. And finally, if even one of your “Deal-breakers” comes from a pain point you’re currently experiencing, you should be open to interviewing. Eye-opening, isn’t it?


Interviewing is a Skill That Needs Practice


In comparison to other things we've done to develop a specific skill, interviewing for most people is probably at the bottom of the list. But just like learning to swing a golf club (which for me is still a skill I'm far from mastering), conducting an effective interview requires a similar sync of requirements that must be completed simultaneously, and you only get one shot. When you practice enough, it becomes second nature and reduces the pressure of interview anxiety that commonly occurs. This becomes especially important when you are faced with a position you absolutely want.


Up-to-Date Resume


When you put yourself in a position where you're willing to accept an interview, another great benefit is that it forces you to have a current resume/CV at the ready. Talent Doc recently had a C-Suite client come to us needing an updated resume the next day for their first formal interview. This was not someone who applied for a position, but was recruited directly for the position; it was a dream job. This individual had climbed the corporate ladder at the same company for the last five years, so it was a bit of a scramble to pull together dates and key takeaways while converting to quantitative achievements. We absolutely got it done, but there was an avoidable cost.



Networking Can Lead to Career Advancement


Interviewing is 100% an opportunity to network. Think about it. You're meeting someone, often a decision-maker, likely in the same industry or role that you're currently in. You generally get 45 minutes to an hour of one-on-one time to connect, learn about one another, and essentially brag about why you're fantastic at what you do. Even if you don't accept that particular role or they go with a different candidate, you're making impressions that can serve you in the future. This encounter can also provide the motivation and confidence you need to ask for the promotion or raise you know you deserve.


Remember, Interviewing Doesn’t Have to Be Overwhelming.


And if you'd like support, the professionals at Talent Doc have your back. We offer resume services, career coaching, and interview preparation to meet your every need. Nothing is standing between you and your dream job, so don't be afraid to go for it!





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